Stage Plays
Click here to read an excerpt from "General Seeger"

General Seeger

(Above) "General Seeger" production photo

Like many of Levin's works, General Seeger was at the vanguard – here, casting a critical lens at the military's PR machine, 20 years before works such as 1979's critically-acclaimed television adaptation of "Friendly Fire" did.

General Seeger is one of a triad of military plays written by Levin – the others being No Time For Sergeants and Notebook Warrior. Just as Levin did with Notebook Warrior, he "wrote what he knew," extrapolating from his own experience as a private in the Army's Public Information Office at Fort Monmouth, New Jersey:


(Above) George C. Scott and William Bendix on first day of rehearsals (Credit: Bert Emanuele for Detroit Free Press)

  • Interview: Detroit Free Press (1962)
  • The show's director, George C. Scott, was not an easy guy to work with. Star William Bendix quit the show before its out of town opening, frustrated with ongoing changes Scott continued making, and which Bendix deemed unnecessary. Indeed – after Levin refused one such change, Scott tried to push Levin down the massive grand staircase of Michigan's Shubert Theater. “He didn't succeed, though; I was holding on too tightly to the bannister.” —Levin (Philadelphia Inquirer, 1976)
  • Gallery

    (Above) "General Seeger" production photo

    (Above) "General Seeger" production photo

    (Above) "General Seeger" production photo

    (Above) "General Seeger" production photo

    (Above) "General Seeger" production photo

    (Above) Ira Levin at "Seeger" rehearsal (1962)

    (Above) Newspaper ad (1962)